Gina Rinehart paints mining trucks pink in honour of breast cancer victims

Originally published by The Daily Telegraph – October 2016.

WHEN Gina Rinehart steps foot on her Roy Hill mine in the Pilbara’s rugged and dusty terrain her mother is not far from her mind.

Having lost her mother Hope to cancer more than 30 years ago, the mining magnate is honouring all women who have lost their battle or survived breast cancer, by painting her mining trucks pink. She has also incorporated her mother’s favourite flower in the logo.

The pink truck are also in honour of those who have survived breast cancer.

“The Sturt’s desert pea is famous for its distinctive beauty, yet extraordinary ability to withstand harsh and difficult environments,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“The strength and beauty of my mother’s and my favourite outback flower symbolises our medical foundations, and more recently, the Georgina Hope Foundation, and more, the strength and beauty in my very dear friend Pat, and her daughter, my incredible goddaughter Rachel, who has been battling aggressive breast cancer for nearly five years.”

Ms Rinehart with others at the Roy Hill mine.

There are 12 of the massive pink trucks at the Roy Hill mine, the ­second-largest of its kind in Australia, which Rinehart has named after incredible women in her life.

“Hope is named after my beautiful mother, my daughter Hope shares her name,” Mrs Rinehart said,

“Ginny is named after my wonderful daughter Ginia and is also the name my precious mother ­affectionately called me.

There are 12 of the massive pink trucks at the Roy Hill mine.

“We should never forget breast cancer is a frightening disease and one that affects and hurts many women across our nation,” she said.

Mrs Rinehart called for a two-minute silence to remember Roy Hill staff member Nola Lynch, who passed away in September.

The mining magnate is honouring all women who have lost their battle or survived breast cancer.

National Breast Cancer Foundation CEO Sarah Hosking, who accepted a $20,000 cheque raised by the Roy Hill mine and Hancock Prospecting, said coming to a working mine and seeing pink trucks was ­remarkable.

“Actions speak louder than words.”

Mrs Rinehart called for a two-minute silence to remember Roy Hill staff member Nola Lynch, who passed away in September.

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